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June 2021

Tuesday, 29 June 2021 00:00

What Are Plantar Warts?

Plantar warts are described as small growths that appear on the heels or other areas of the feet that bear a large amount of weight. The pressure in these areas causes plantar warts to hide behind thick layers of skin called calluses. In most cases, plantar warts are not a serious health issue, and they usually go away without treatment. However, it is still important be mindful of them.

Plantar warts are caused by infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the outer layer of skin on the soles of the feet. The plantar warts then develop when the virus enters the body through weak spots at the bottom of the feet, such as tiny cuts and breaks. Plantar warts are not guaranteed for all who encounter the virus. Everyone responds differently to the affects of HPV.

Plantar warts are most common in the following groups: children and teenagers, people with weakened immune systems, people with history of plantar warts, and people who walk barefoot. Exposure to HPV is common in environments such as locker rooms or pool areas.

One of early signs to look out for is a callus, since many plantar warts hide behind them. You can also locate these warts by looking for small, fleshy, rough, grainy growths near the base of the toes and the heel. Early signs of plantar warts are shown by black pinpoints, which are small, clotted blood vessels. Lesions that interrupt normal lines and ridges in the skin of your foot may also be a sign of plantar warts. Any feeling of pain while walking or standing can also be a symptom of plantar warts.

Although most cases are not serious, some conditions may require a visit to your podiatrist.  If you are uncertain that your lesion is a wart, if you have diabetes, or if you are experiencing bleeding, you may need to see a seek professional treatment. Your doctor may offer treatments such as prescribing stronger peeling medicine or using cryotherapy by applying liquid nitrogen to the wart. More serious cases may require minor surgery or laser treatment.

There are simple solutions available to help prevent plantar warts. One common task is to avoid walking barefoot in swimming pool areas and locker rooms, as this is where HPV is commonly present. Keeping your feet clean and dry, while changing shoes and socks daily can also help prevent future plantar warts. If you know someone who has plantar warts, it is important to avoid direct contact with their warts. You should also refrain from picking or scratching your wart if you happen to develop one.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 29 June 2021 00:00

An Overview of Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are benign skin growths that occur on the soles of the feet due to a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV can get into the feet through a tiny crack in the skin and make the top layer of skin grow rapidly, thereby creating a wart. Warts on the bottom of the feet may be asymptomatic, or they may cause pain or discomfort while standing or walking due to pressure on the bottom of the foot. Plantar warts can typically be diagnosed through a physical examination and can be treated through medications, cryotherapy, or surgical removal. If you have plantar warts, consult with a podiatrist to find the right treatment for you.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Bruce Smit, DPM from Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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A broken or fractured ankle is a potentially painful injury that can range in severity from a mild avulsion fracture to a severe break of the tibia, fibula, or both. The symptoms of a broken ankle may include pain at the site of the fracture, significant swelling, bruising, ankle deformity, and an inability to walk. In the case of an open fracture, the broken bone may even protrude from the skin. Broken ankles require a diagnosis and medical treatment. Your podiatrist will be able to diagnose a fracture through a combination of physical examination and imaging studies like X-rays, bone scans, or MRIs. If you suspect that you may have broken your ankle, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Bruce Smit, DPM from Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 22 June 2021 00:00

All About Broken Ankle

Broken ankles or “ankle fractures” are a type of injury that occurs when the bones that make up the ankle joint are broken. Ankle injuries are some of the most common bone and joint injuries. The ankle joint is made up of three bones that join. The tibia is the main bone, and it makes up the inside of the anklebone. The fibula is a smaller bone, and it makes up the outside of the anklebone. A membrane called the joint capsule is lined with a layer called the synovium, which covers the entire joint. The synovium produces synovial fluid which allows for the joint surfaces to move.

An ankle becomes broken when the joint is stressed beyond the strength of its limits. When an ankle is fractured, ligaments may also tear at the same time. Fractures often occur to the ankle rolling or twisting in an unusual way. At times, a fracture may even be caused by an extreme force applied to the joint.

Symptoms of a broken ankle include pain, swelling, bruising, discoloration, numbness, and an inability to move the toes. If you have a broken ankle, you may also hear something tear or snap when you initially suffered the injury. If you have pain from a broken ankle, beware that the pain will not always come from the exact area of the fracture; you may also experience pain from associated foot fractures. The swelling you may experience can suggest that soft tissue damage may have occurred due to the injury.

There are differences between an ankle fracture and an ankle sprain. The difference is that a fracture or break in the bone is required to classify an injury as a broken ankle. An ankle sprain occurs when there is a tear or disruption of ligaments in the ankle. In some cases, the prognosis of an ankle sprain may be worse than that of a fracture.

X-rays are the most common way used to diagnose a broken ankle. X-rays show if the ankle is broken and where exactly the fracture is located. It will also show how many pieces of broken bone there are. A second method of testing to see if an ankle is broken is a stress test.  To do this, the doctor will put pressure on the ankle and perform a stress test to determine if the fracture requires surgery. Other methods for diagnosis include CT scans and MRI scans.

If you are suffering from a broken ankle, consult with your podiatrist immediately to receive a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Published in Featured

Striking a good balance between standing, sitting, and moving around throughout the day is optimal for the human body. But what do you do if your job requires you to stand most of the time? Prolonged standing (standing for more than 8 hours) puts an abundance of pressure on your feet, joints and back, and can cause ongoing circulation problems in the feet and legs (chronic venous insufficiency) with symptoms such as swelling (edema), varicose veins, and even leg ulcers should the condition progress. To help ease the burden you put on your body by working on your feet all day, try to sit as much as possible during breaks, move around whenever you can and change standing positions frequently to shift body weight around. You should also try to soften your knees, use a wide stance to balance your weight evenly, engage your core whenever possible to relieve stress on your feet and knees, and stand on a cushioned mat if possible. Above all else, wear good shoes that fit well, offer proper heel and arch support, and have a sole that’s wider than the heel. If you contact a podiatrist, they can offer additional advice on proper footwear, create custom orthotics to support your particular foot and ankle structure all day, and address issues you may be experiencing in those areas.

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact Bruce Smit, DPM from Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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In 2014, the American Podiatric Medical Association surveyed 1,000 American adults and found that half of all respondents lived with foot pain. Fortunately, there are ways to avoid foot problems such as following a daily footcare routine and wearing proper footwear at work.

If you have a job that requires you to be on your feet, it is best that you do not wear flat sole shoes. Your heel should be slightly elevated (less than 2 inches, but at least ¼-inch) if you are going to be standing for a prolonged period. You should also make sure that the shoes you wear are not too small. Tight shoes may cut off circulation to your feet, which will result in pain and blisters. It is always best to purchase fitted shoes later in the day, because the feet tend to swell as the day progresses. It may also be helpful to buy shoes a half size larger if you plan on wearing custom orthotics or arch supports.

Your muscles may become stiff when you are constantly standing up. It is important to take breaks every hour to stretch and relax. One tip is to perform calf raises, because this exercise will help improve your circulation. To perform this stretch, you first need to stand on the edge of a step with your abdominal muscles pulled inward. You then need to grip the step with the balls of your feet with your heels hanging over the edge. Next, try to raise your heels above the step by a few inches while standing on your tiptoes; hold this pose for a second. You should then lower your heels back even to the platform. These calf raises should be done ten times for full effectiveness.

You should also take care of your feet while you are at home. One of the best ways to prepare your feet for a long day of work is to soak them in ice water. Doing so for 20 minutes will help fight the swelling and inflammation that results from being on your feet at work.

Nevertheless, if you are experiencing pain in your feet, you should seek help from your podiatrist. Your doctor will help treat any ailments you may have in addition to helping you prevent any other ailments from developing in the future.

Published in Featured
Saturday, 12 June 2021 00:00

Gout Pain Can Be Managed

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 08 June 2021 00:00

Ingrown Toenails

An ingrown toenail is a nail that has curved downward and grown into the skin.  This typically occurs at either the nail borders or the sides of the nail.  As a result, pain, redness, swelling, and warmth may occur in the toe.  If a break in the skin forms due to the ingrown nail, bacteria may enter and cause an infection in the area; this is typically characterized by a foul odor and drainage.

Ingrown toenails have multiple reasons for developing.  In many instances, the condition is a result of genetics and is inherited.  The most common cause, however, is improper trimming; cutting the toenails too short forces the skin beside the nail to fold over.  An ingrown toenail can also develop due to trauma, such as stubbing the toe, having an object fall on the toe, or participating in activities that involve repeated kicking or running.  Wearing shoes that are too tight or too short can also cause ingrown toenails.

Treatment for an ingrown toenail varies between patients and the severity of the condition.  In most cases, it is best to see your podiatrist for thorough and proper treatment.  After examining your toe, your podiatrist may prescribe oral antibiotics to clear the infection if one is present.  Surgical removal of either a portion of the nail or the entire nail may also be considered.  In some cases, complete removal or destruction of the nail root may be required.  Most patients who undergo nail surgery experience minimal pain afterward and can return to normal activity the following day.

Ingrown toenails can be prevented with proper nail trimming and by avoiding improper-fitting shoes.  When cutting the toenails, be sure that you are cutting in a straight line and avoid cutting them too short.  Shoes should not be too short or tight in the toe box.

Published in Featured
Tuesday, 08 June 2021 00:00

How Ingrown Toenails Occur

An ingrown toenail occurs when the toenail curves and grows down into the skin on the sides of the nail. As the toenail digs into the flesh and the flesh grows around it, pain, inflammation, redness, swelling or even an infection can follow. Common factors that lead to ingrown toenails include genetics (such as poor posture, gait, or a deformity), improperly cutting the toenails, and wearing tight shoes. Ingrown toenails are not usually serious. However, they can become very painful and infected if left untreated. If you have diabetes or a compromised immune system, your nail is in persistent pain, or your nail is showing signs of being infected, you should consult with a podiatrist for a proper treatment option.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Bruce Smit, DPM of Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Shockwave therapy is one treatment option for plantar fasciitis, a condition that causes heel and foot inflammation and pain. This type of injury is often caused by overworking the feet. Heel pain is most common in people that exercise often, individuals who are overweight, and people whose profession require them to stand for long periods of time.

Heel pain can be caused by a number of problems including ill-fitting shoes, strenuous exercise routines or work hazards. Simple treatment options involve buying new shoes, taking ibuprofen, doing heel and foot exercises, and resting your feet. For severe cases, shockwave therapy can be considered a more viable form of treatment.

Shockwave therapy should be considered for patients that have had unsuccessful treatment or whose heel pain has lasted for more than six months. In shockwave therapy, a device delivers shockwaves to the patient’s body, which jumpstart the body’s repair mechanisms. These mechanisms then begin working more effectively to repair damage done to the heel area.

Shockwave therapy also helps eliminate pain in the heel area. When the body’s natural repair mechanisms are triggered, tissue healing in the body is sped up. This leads to pain reduction after pain transmission nerves are stimulated.

Shockwave therapy eliminates the risk factors associated with surgery, such as the use of anesthetics, and is less invasive. Since this technique also helps improve the body’s natural healing techniques, recovery time should be shorter than surgical procedures.

Discomfort issues can also be a side effect of treatment. Short-term issues normally include skin bruising, minor pain during and after treatment, swelling of the heel, and discolored tissue. However, these side effects of shockwave therapy usually disappear after a few days. The fast recovery time of shockwave therapy makes it easy for patients to return to their daily routines.

Like most types of treatments, surgeries, and medications, shockwave therapy is not for everyone. Potential patients with heart conditions and people with pacemakers should not be considered for this technique. People on certain types of medications, usually medications affecting blood clotting, would be ineligible for shockwave therapy. Children and pregnant women should avoid this treatment option as well.

Overall, shockwave therapy could be a great option for heel pain. It is less invasive than surgery, helps trigger natural healing mechanisms, and should be considered by people who have had long bouts of heel pain or tried conventional treatment options that were unsuccessful.

Published in Featured
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