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February 2022

Tuesday, 22 February 2022 00:00

Easing Broken Toe Pain

Broken toes, while painful, are typically not serious and have a good prognosis, with most injuries healing within four to six weeks. In addition to pain, symptoms of a broken toe include swelling, bruising, and difficulty walking on the affected toe. Severe breaks, which may involve the bone sticking out at an angle, a visible deformity of the toe, or the bone breaking through the skin, should be treated by a medical professional immediately. A mild injury can be treated at home while you wait to see your podiatrist. If you suspect your toe may be broken, rest and elevate the affected foot on cushions, apply ice wrapped in a towel to the toe, and take over-the-counter medications to reduce pain and swelling. If symptoms do not improve within a few days, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Bruce Smit, DPM from Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a condition caused by compression of the posterior tibial nerve, which runs through a canal near the heel and into the sole of the foot. When the posterior tibial nerve is compressed, symptoms such as foot and ankle pain, burning, tingling, and numbness can arise. This condition is typically treated through conservative methods. These include resting and icing the affected foot, taking over-the-counter pain medications, wearing orthotics, immobilizing the foot, physical therapy, and steroid injections. In severe cases where conservative treatments have failed, decompression surgery may be needed. To learn more about tarsal tunnel syndrome, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Bruce Smit, DPM of Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 08 February 2022 00:00

All About Haglund’s Deformity

Do you have a visible bony bump on the back of your heel? If so, you may have a Haglund’s deformity, an abnormality of the foot bone and surrounding soft tissues. Though often harmless, in some people, the deformity can cause pain due to the bony bump rubbing against shoes and irritating the soft tissues around it. This can lead to another condition called bursitis, which can make the deformity larger. The larger deformity, in turn, leads to more irritation and a cycle of pain. People who wear high heels or shoes with tight or rigid backs are at an increased risk of this condition. Conservative treatments for Haglund’s deformity include wearing shoes with open backs, heel pads, or orthotics, applying ice to the bumps, and taking over-the-counter pain medications. Surgery may be an option if more conservative treatment methods fail. For more information, please consult with a podiatrist.  

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Bruce Smit, DPM of Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 07 February 2022 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 01 February 2022 00:00

Who Needs an ABI Test?

An Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) test is a screening tool that is used to assess circulation in the lower limbs. During an ABI test, the doctor takes your blood pressure at various points along your arms and lower legs and compares the numbers to determine your risk of having full or partial blockages in the blood flow of your lower limbs. Not everyone needs an ABI test. They are typically done for people who are at risk of peripheral artery disease, a condition characterized by poor circulation in the extremities. People who are at risk of having peripheral artery disease include those with a history of smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, as well as older adults and people who have a family history of peripheral artery disease. To learn more, please consult with a podiatrist.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Bruce Smit, DPM from Frankfort Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Frankfort, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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